3000 Level Courses

AP/PHIL3020 3.0 ETHICS

An advanced course in theoretical ethics, understood as covering both normative ethical theory and metaethics.
Prerequisite: At least one of: AP/PHIL 2070 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2075 3.00. Course credit exclusion: GL/PHIL 3237 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/AS/PHIL 3020 3.00.

AP/PHIL3030 3.0 METAPHYSICS

Metaphysics concerns such issues as the nature of reality, the existence of contingent and necessary truths, universals, perception and the nature of the external world.
Prerequisite: At least one of AP/PHIL 2110 3.00, AP/PHIL 2080 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2170 3.00. Course credit exclusion: GL/PHIL 3985 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009:  Course credit exclusions: AK/AS/PHIL 3030 3.00.

AP/PHIL3035 3.0 EPISTEMOLOGY

Theories of knowledge are examined in relation to theories of reality. How does our perception of reality relate to our understanding of it? How can we come to know something is true or false?
Prerequisite: At least one of: AP/PHIL 2080 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2110 3.00. Course credit exclusion: AP/PHIL 3035 3.00 (prior to Fall 2010), GL/PHIL 3934 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: Course credit exclusion: AS/PHIL 3035 3.00.

AP/PHIL3040 3.0 AESTHETICS

An examination from a contemporary philosophical perspective of problems concerning aesthetic experience, the nature of art, the structure and properties of works of art, creativity and appreciation, reasons and standards in art criticism.
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2130 3.00 or at least six credits in philosophy. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/PHIL 3040 3.00.

AP/PHIL3050 3.0 BUSINESS ETHICS

An examination of the role of ethics in private, public and voluntary sector economic activity. Concepts include, the concept of a free market and the role of government regulation, governance issues, corporate social responsibility, ethics codes, globalization and cross-cultural codes and standards.
Prerequisite: At least one of the following: AP/PHIL 2050 6.00, AP/PHIL 2060 3.00, AP/PHIL 2070 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2075 3.00. Course credit exclusions: AP/PHIL 3025 3.00, AP/PHIL 3560 3.00, AP/PHIL 3570 3.00, GL/PHIL 3642 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/AS/PHIL 3050 3.00, AK/PHIL 3560 3.00 (prior to Winter 2007), AK/PHIL 3570 3.00, AS/PHIL 3025 3.00, AS/PHIL 3025 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2000-2001), and AS/PHIL 4160 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 1988-1989

AP/PHIL3080 3.0 KANT

"For the chief question is always simply this: what and how much can the understanding and reason know apart from all experience?" Kant's answer revolutionized philosophy. It is given in the Critique of Pure Reason, which will be studied in detail.
Prerequisites: AP/PHIL 2020 3.00 and AP/PHIL 2025 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/PHIL 3080 3.00 (prior to Summer 2007), AS/PHIL 3080 3.00.

AP/PHIL3081 3.0 Hegel

An examination of the philosophy of G.W.F. Hegel, with a special focus on his Phenomenology of Spirit.
Prerequisites: Six credits in Philosophy.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/PHIL 3081 3.00.

AP/PHIL3082 3.0 MARX, MARXISM, AND POST-MARXISM

An examination of the development of Marxist philosophy through a survey of central texts by Marx, as well as some contemporary "post-Marxist" movements such as critical theory, anti-globalization and postmodernism.
Prerequisite: Six credits in philosophy. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/PHIL 3082 3.00.

AP/PHIL3095 3.0 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

How do theistic philosophies deal with the fact of evil? Are religious language and forms of knowing distinct from other forms? What are the moral and ethical issues inherent in religious propagation?
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2090 3.0 or at least six credits in philosophy.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009:  Course credit exclusions: AK/AS/PHIL 3095 3.00, AK/PHIL 3650 6.00 (prior to Winter 2007).

AP/PHIL3101 3.0 PHILOSOPHY OF LOGIC

A study of issues relating to the study of symbolic logic to ordinary language, including the nature of truth, the nature of sentences versus propositions, semantics for natural language (the Liar paradox, descriptions, reference, demonstratives) and syntactical versus semantic conceptions of inference.
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2100 3.0.  Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009:  Course credit exclusions: AK/PHIL 3101 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2007), AS/PHIL 3101 3.00.

AP/PHIL3102 3.0 INTERMEDIATE LOGIC

This course develops the full predicate calculus with identity, and applies it to some philosophical problems. It introduces basic set theory and semantic concepts which are important for understanding how logical languages work, and discusses philosophical issues about identity and reference. It is a continuation of an introduction to logic.
Prerequisites: AP/PHIL 2100 3.00. Course credit exclusions: None. Not open to: Math majors.

AP/PHIL3110 3.0 POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

An exploration of major topics in political philosophy, such as the authority of the state, the justification of private property, the nature of rights, theories of justice, and political equality.
Prerequisite: At least one of the following: AP/PHIL 2050 6.0, AP/PHIL 2060 3.0, AP/PHIL 2070 3.0 or AP/PHIL 2075 3.0.

AP/PHIL3120 3.0 EARLY EXISTENTIALISM

A detailed study of the early existentialist thinkers such as Pascal and Kierkegaard. Emphasis will be on their views concerning knowledge and faith, God and humankind, freedom and self-deception.
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2120 3.0. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/AS/PHIL 3120 3.00.

AP/PHIL3125 3.0 CONTEMPORARY EXISTENTIALISM

The views of such recent philosophers as Nietzsche, Sartre, Camus, and de Beauvoir have had a great impact on contemporary society. This course explores their views on self, freedom, action and personal relations.
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2120 3.0.  Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/AS/PHIL 3125 3.00.

AP/PHIL3140 3.0 RUSSEL & LOGICAL POSITIVISM

An examination of Bertrand Russell's extensive contribution to philosophy along with that of the early Wittgenstein and the Vienna Circle Positivists such as Carnap, Schlick and Ayer.
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2100 3.00 or at least six credits in philosophy.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/AS/PHIL 3140 3.00.

AP/PHIL3145 3.0 WITTGENSTEIN

A critical examination of the philosophic writings of the later Wittgenstein focusing on his most crucial work, The Philosophical Investigations.
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2080 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2100 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2240 3.00. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009:  Course credit exclusions: AK/PHIL 3145 3.00 (prior to Summer 2007), AS/PHIL 3145 3.00.

AP/PHIL3170 3.0 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

An examination and critique of the history, fundamental assumptions and methodologies of science. Topics to be discussed may include the nature of scientific theories, the problem of induction, theories of probability, and the demarcation and growth of scientific knowledge.
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2110 3.00 or at least six credits in philosophy. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/PHIL 3175 3.00, AS/PHIL 3170 3.00
CROSSLISTED:  SC/STS 3170 3.0

AP/PHIL3180 CONVERSATIONS WITH AFRICAN PHILOSOPHY

An examination of the development of African philosophy in the 20th century focusing on the debates among African philosophers regarding the nature of philosophical problems. The course studies the emergence of various schools of thought in ethics, epistemology and ontology.
Prerequisite: At least six credits in philosophy. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/PHIL 3180 3.00.

AP/PHIL3190 3.0 PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUES IN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

An exploration of philosophical issues in constitutional law. Among the topics covered are: the nature of constitutions; the value of written constitutions; theories of constitutional interpretation; judicial review and judicial activism; constitutional rights.
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2050 6.00. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: AK/AS/PHIL 2050 6.00. Course credit exclusion: AS/PHIL 3190 3.00.

AP/PHIL3195 3.0 PUNISHMENT AND RESPONSIBILITY

An exploration of a range of philosophical questions raised by the practice of legal punishment, including: What justifies imposing punishment upon those who break the law? What assumptions about the responsibility of individuals are implicit in our punishment practices?
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2050 6.00. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: AK/AS/PHIL 2050 6.00. Course credit exclusion: AS/PHIL 3195 3.00.

AP/PHIL3200 3.0 PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE

This course provides an introduction to basic notions of the philosophy of language. Questions to be discussed may include: How is communication in language possible? What is a language? What makes words and phrases meaningful? What is truth?
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2080 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2100 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2240 3.00. Course credit exclusion: GL/PHIL 3910 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/AS/PHIL 3200 3.00.

AP/PHIL3220 3.0 ARGUMENTATION THEORY

Dispute and argument have been studied by philosophers since ancient times. This course examines the nature of dispute in the context of both the history of philosophy and modern research.
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2100 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2200 3.00. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/PHIL 3220 3.00.

AP/PHIL3260 3.0 PHILOSOPHY OF PSYCHOLOGY

An examination of whether psychological research can help to answer traditional philosophical questions. Case studies may include: psychiatric and mental disorders, rational thought, animal cognition, the placebo effect, the nature of concepts, attribution theory, moral psychology, or consciousness.
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2160 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2240 3.00. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/PHIL 3260 3.00, AS/PHIL 3260 (prior to Summer 2007).

AP/PHIL3265 3.0 PHILOSOPHY OF MIND

Topics covered include the ontological status of the mind, the nature of mental causation, consciousness and its relation to our status as rational persons equipped with free will. Other possible questions include: Is language necessary for thought? Can some nonhuman animals think? What is the relationship between emotions and rationality?
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2160 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2240 3.00. Course credit exclusion: GL/PHIL 3657 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/PHIL 3260 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2000-2001), AS/PHIL 3265 3.00.

AP/PHIL3270 3.0 PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

An introduction to central ideas in the philosophy of social science. Topics for discussion may include: the debate concerning naturalism in social science, human rationality, scientism and functionalism.
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2110 3.00 or at least six credits in philosophy. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/PHIL 3270 3.00.

AP/PHIL3280 3.0 PHILOSOPHY OF BIOLOGY

This course concerns philosophical issues arising from the life sciences. Topics may include: What is it that makes something living? What does evolution mean for the understanding of human nature? Are religion and the theory of evolution compatible or irreconcilable?
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2110 3.00 or at least six credits in philosophy. Course credit exclusion: AP/PHIL 3280 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013).
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/PHIL 3280 3.00, AS/PHIL 3280 3.00.

AP/PHIL3400 3.0 PRAGMATISM

This class will provide a general introduction to the Pragmatic Tradition in philosophy, covering: (1) the 19th Century origins of Pragmatism in Peirce and James's distinctive critique of traditional philosophy, (2) Pragmatism's development and transformation through the 20th century, and (3) the competing varieties of 'Neopragmatism' we see today.
Prerequisite: 6.00-credits in Philosophy. Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/PHIL3450 3.0 MODERN CHINESE PHILOSOPHY

This course will begin with an introduction to major modes of thought in traditional China. The major part of this course, however, will be devoted to studying contemporary Chinese philosophy with special emphasis on the philosophy of Mao.
Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/PHIL 3450 3.00

AP/PHIL3510 3.0 FEMINIST APPROACHES TO ETHICS & POLITICS

A study of recent feminist writing in ethics and political philosophy. Topics include: feminist critiques of ethical theory, the (potentially) gendered nature of value, the relationship between justice and care, and issues like reproductive autonomy, sexual violence, and global injustice.
Prerequisites: AP/ PHIL 2500 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2070 3.00 or AP/GWST 2500 6.00 (or AP/WMST 2500 6.00 prior to Fall 2013). Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/PHIL3519 3.0 FEMINIST APPROACHES TO EPISTEMOLOGY

An examination of recent feminist writing in epistemology and the philosophy of science. Topics include the nature of objectivity, the situated knower and the potentially gendered (and embodied) nature of knowledge, feminist critiques of scientific method and practice, and recent trends in feminist epistemology.
Prerequisites: AP/PHIL 2250 3.00 or AP/ PHIL 2500 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2080 3.00 or AP/ WMST 2500 6.00. Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/PHIL3570 3.0 ETHICS OF ADMINISTRATION

An examination of the ethical basis of professional administration for both the public and private setting. The course looks at ethical dilemmas encountered by the administrator or manager and provides techniques for their resolution.
Course credit exclusions: AP/PHIL 3430 6.00, AP/PHIL 3540 6.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/PHIL 3570.

AP/PHIL3575 3.0 INTRODUCTION TO BIOETHICS

Should comatose patients be kept alive indefinitely? Should an alcoholic receive a liver transplant? This course explores the philosophical dimensions of bioethics, i.e., the branch of applied ethics that proposes practical responses to moral problems that arise in medical practice and in the development and distribution of health care resources.
Course credit exclusion: AP/PHIL 2077 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013).

AP/PHIL3576 3.0 ETHICAL ISSUES IN BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH

An investigation into how ethics, law and policy should respond to the tensions between paternalism and autonomy, and therapeutic and scientific responsibilities in biomedical research with human subjects.
Course credit exclusions: None.
Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/PHIL 3576 3.00.

AP/PHIL3595 3.0 INTERNATIONAL ETHICS

An examination of the role of norms in the analysis of international relations, in particular as they apply to foreign actor involvement in conflicts within states as a response to massive human rights violence, ethnic cleansing, and genocide.
Prerequisites: AP/PHIL 2060 3.00, AP/PHIL 2070 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2075 3.00. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/AS/PHIL 3595 3.00.

AP/PHIL3600 3.0 ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

An examination of the background, structure and arguments of one of the great works of Plato or Aristotle. Alternatively, it may also focus on the works of others, including the Presocratics, the Stoics, the Epicureans and the Neoplatonists.
Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2010 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2015 3.00. Course credit exclusion: GL/PHIL 3927 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/PHIL 3600 3.00, AS/PHIL 3600 3.00 and AK/PHIL 3610 3.00 (prior to Fall 2005).

AP/PHIL3620 3.0 EMPIRICISM & RATIONALISM

The empiricists and rationalists include such eminent philosophers as Hume, Descartes, Berkeley and Locke (among others). This course examines selected readings from one or more representatives of each tradition.
Prerequisite: At least six credits in philosophy. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/PHIL 3620 3.00.

AP/PHIL3635 3.0 PHILOSOPHY OF NEUROSCIENCE

A critical examination of philosophical problems raised by neuroscientific research, which asks whether such research can help to answer traditional philosophical questions. The course introduces the goals, methods, techniques and theoretical as well as conceptual commitments of neuroscience and examines the field's background assumptions, limitations and pitfalls.
Prerequisites: AP/PHIL 2160 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2240 3.00. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/AS/PHIL 3635 3.00, AS/PHIL 3260 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2007-2008).

AP/PHIL3640 3.0 PHENOMENOLOGY & HERMENEUTICS

How does meaningful experience arise for individual consciousness? How do we understand and interpret different objects, artworks and cultures? This course examines the answers of philosophers such as Husserl, Heidegger, Dilthey and Gadamar.
Prerequisite: At least 6 credits in Philosophy. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/PHIL 3640 3.00.

AP/PHIL3690 3.0 POST-MODERNIST PHILOSOPHY

An examination of philosophers identified with the Post-Modernist critique of culture and philosophy; for example, Derrida, Deleuze, Foucault, Rorty, Irigaray, Heidegger, Baudrillard and Kristeva.
Prerequisite: At least six credits in Philosophy. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/PHIL 3990C 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2002-2003), AK/PHIL 3690 3.00.

AP/PHIL3750 3.0 PHILOSOPHY OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

An introduction to philosophical issues in Artificial Intelligence (AI). The goal is for students to be able to gain basic understanding of the cognitive architectures used by Al programmers, and reflect critically on research in Al from a philosophical perspective.
Prerequisite:  AP/PHIL 2100 3.00 and one of AP/PHIL 2160 3.00 or AP/PHIL 2240 3.00. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/PHIL 3001 3.00, AS/PHIL 3750 3.00.

AP/PHIL3776 3.0 TECHNOLOGY AND ETHICS

An examination of the ethical impact of recent technologies such as computers/Internet, biomedicine, and environmental technologies. Case studies are used to understand how these advances pose dangers and possibilities to our traditional conceptions of human value.
Course credit exclusions: None.
Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/PHIL 3776 3.00.